Most Holy Trinity Catholic Church

Image Number: 00247
<br>Sanctuary ceiling above side aisle viewed from choir loft at Most Holy Trinity Catholic Church
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--Detroit, Michigan Image Number: 00248
<br>Grandfather clock in rectory at Most Holy Trinity Catholic Church
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--Detroit, Michigan Image Number: 00249
<br>Detail of cherub in woodwork at Most Holy Trinity Catholic Church
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--Detroit, Michigan Image Number: 00250
<br>Crucifix at Most Holy Trinity Catholic Church
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--Detroit, Michigan Image Number: 00251
<br>Sanctuary at Most Holy Trinity Catholic Church
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--Detroit, Michigan Image Number: 00252
<br>Sanctuary ceiling and pipe organ at Most Holy Trinity Catholic Church
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--Detroit, Michigan Image Number: 00253
<br>Stained glass window lighting choir loft pews at Most Holy Trinity Catholic Church
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--Detroit, Michigan Image Number: 00641
<br>Facade of Most Holy Trinity Catholic Church
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--Detroit, Michigan Image Number: 00642
<br>Facade of Most Holy Trinity Catholic Church
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--Detroit, Michigan

Location Name:  Most Holy Trinity Catholic Church (Detroit, Michigan)

Location Type:  Church (Catholic)

Year Completed:  1866

Architect(s):  Patrick Keeley

History:  

As Irish immigrants began to flow into Detroit after the 1825 opening of the Erie Canal, a parish was needed to serve these newcomers. Founded in 1834 by Father Martin Kundig, Most Holy Trinity was the first English language Roman Catholic parish in Detroit. Originally located on Cadillac Square in Downtown, Most Holy Trinity and Father Kundig quickly made their mark on history. In 1834, the year the parish was founded, the new church building was converted into a medical facility for victims of Detroit’s cholera epidemic. Father Kundig led the relief efforts and Most Holy Trinity became the first hospital in the Northwest Territory.

As the epidemic passed and the congregation began to grow, the decision was made to relocate the church to its current location on what is now the western outskirts of the Downtown business district. The original structure was moved to the new location in 1849, and work soon began on the current building. Architect Patrick Keeley was chosen to design the Gothic Revival church, and it was completed in 1866. The simple red brick structure, topped by a tall copper steeple is the most recognizable building in Detroit’s Corktown neighborhood. While Corktown is no longer an ethnic enclave of Irish immigrants, the neighborhood is Detroit’s oldest and it retains some of its historic charm, especialy in Most Holy Trinity.

Most Holy Trinity Catholic Church was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978 as part of the Corktown Historic District.

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