Milwaukee Junction

Image Number: 00923
<br>Railroad tracks over Interstate 75 with Detroit skyline in the distance just west of Milwaukee Junction<br>
--Detroit, Michigan Image Number: 00924
<br>Overgrown railroad bridge over Brush Street just west of Milwaukee Junction<br>
--Detroit, Michigan Image Number: 00925
<br>Old railroad loading area for the Ford Piquette Avenue Plant (in the background) just west of Milwaukee Junction<br>
--Detroit, Michigan Image Number: 00926
<br>Old railroad loading area for the Ford Piquette Avenue Plant just west of Milwaukee Junction<br>
--Detroit, Michigan Image Number: 00927
<br>Overgrown railroad bridge over Beaubien Street and Fisher Body Plant 23 just west of Milwaukee Junction<br>
--Detroit, Michigan Image Number: 00928
<br>Detail of abandoned railroad bridge over Beaubien Street with Ford Piquette Avenue Plant in the background just west of Milwaukee Junction<br>
--Detroit, Michigan Image Number: 00929
<br>Ford Piquette Avenue Plant (on the right) and Fisher Body Plant 23 (on the left) looking down Beaubien Street from an abandoned railroad bridge just west of Milwaukee Junction<br>
--Detroit, Michigan Image Number: 00930
<br>Railroad tracks with New Center skyline in the distance just west of Milwaukee Junction<br>
--Detroit, Michigan Image Number: 00931
<br>Railroad tracks just west of Milwaukee Junction<br>
--Detroit, Michigan Image Number: 00932
<br>Railroad bridge over Hastings Street just west of Milwaukee Junction<br>
--Detroit, Michigan Image Number: 00933
<br>Railroad tracks at Milwaukee Junction with Russell Industrial Center in the background<br>
--Detroit, Michigan Image Number: 00934
<br>Railroad tracks at Milwaukee Junction and Russell Industrial Center<br>
--Detroit, Michigan Image Number: 00935
<br>Detail of steel barricade near radio tower at Milwaukee Junction with Milwaukee Park Lofts in the background<br>
--Detroit, Michigan Image Number: 00936
<br>Railroad tracks at Milwaukee Junction with Russell Industrial Center in the background<br>
--Detroit, Michigan Image Number: 00937
<br>Railroad bridge over Milwaukee Street just west of Milwaukee Junction<br>
--Detroit, Michigan Image Number: 00938
<br>Railroad bridge over Hastings Street just west of Milwaukee Junction<br>
--Detroit, Michigan Image Number: 00939
<br>Detail of cement wall along Hastings Street just west of Milwaukee Junction<br>
--Detroit, Michigan Image Number: 00940
<br>View down Hastings Street with Fisher Body Plant 21 in the distance just west of Milwaukee Junction<br>
--Detroit, Michigan

Location Name:  Milwaukee Junction (Detroit, Michigan)

Location Type:  City Area

Year Settled:  1890s

History:  

The Milwaukee Junction area of Detroit covers approximately one square mile just east of the city’s New Center district. This part of Detroit was developed in the 1890s to encourage industrial expansion in what was then the far northern section of the city. As the neighborhood began to grow, so did the manufacturing industry that nearly blankets the entire area today. This area was built up around the confluence of two major railroad lines; the Detroit, Grand Haven and Milwaukee Railway and the Chicago, Detroit and Canada Grand Trunk Junction Railroad. With such convenient access to two major rail lines, businesses could efficiently ship their parts around the nation. Soon the area was dominated by factories that built wooden horse carriages. As the automobile industry began to gain momentum, these factories switched to build automobiles or become parts suppliers to the growing industry.

Milwaukee Junction quickly became known as the "Cradle of the Automobile Industry" due to the concentration of this new industry in the area. The area became home to Everitt-Metzger-Flanders (EMF), Hupp, Brush Motor Car Company, Cadillac, Dodge, Packard and Studebaker. The area was also home to two Fisher Auto Body plants. Perhaps the most notable of the Milwaukee Junction factories was the Ford Motor Company’s Piquette Avenue Plant. The Ford Piquette Plant became the proving ground for Ford’s experimentation with assembly line production. The plant was also the birthplace of the Ford Model T until its production was moved to nearby Highland Park.

Milwaukee Junction quickly became known as the "Cradle of the Automobile Industry" due to the concentration of this new industry in the area. The area became home to Everitt-Metzger-Flanders (EMF), Hupp, Brush Motor Car Company, Cadillac, Dodge, Packard and Studebaker. The area was also home to two Fisher Auto Body plants. Perhaps the most notable of the Milwaukee Junction factories was the Ford Motor Company’s Piquette Avenue Plant. The Ford Piquette Plant became the proving ground for Ford’s experimentation with assembly line production. The plant was also the birthplace of the Ford Model T until its production was moved to Highland Park.

Sources